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Dates

Wednesday 1 May - Saturday 4 May 2013

Contacts

If you have any questions about the conference please contact your local AAGGO representative in the first instance.

AAGGO representatives may contact:

Carol Hunt
For queries relating to registrations or cancellations for the 2013 conference
carol.hunt@bigpond.com

Maryann Mussared
For queries relating to AAGGO Council business
mussared@netspeed.com.au

 

Image detail above:
Ramingining Artists The Aboriginal Memorial 1987–88 (detail), National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, purchased with the assistance of funds from National Gallery admission charges and commissioned in 1987

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The 2013 biennial conference of the Association of Australian Gallery Guiding Organisations (AAGGO) will be held in Canberra at the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), Wednesday 1 – Saturday 4 May 2013, to coincide with Canberra's Centenary year.

The conference theme is A Capital Collection – Art for the Nation and will include discussion of the national art collection, national arts policies, specific art practices, and guiding techniques and technologies.

 

Who can attend the conference?

The AAGGO conference is open to voluntary guides at the 19 Australian art galleries and museums that form the membership of AAGGO. A list of AAGGO member galleries can be found here.

Applications to attend the conference are processed by the AAGGO representative at each gallery or museum.

Regrettably, space limitations preclude non-members of AAGGO attending the conference unless invited by the organising committee. It will not be possible to issue any such invitations until close to the conference, once the AAGGO member needs have been met.


William James Mildenhall Naming of Canberra by Lady Denman 1901-1948, National Library of Australia, Canberra

At the laying of the Foundation Stone for Canberra in 1913, the then Prime Minister, Andrew Fisher said:

"Here on this spot, in the near future, and, I hope the distant future too, the best thoughts of Australia will be given expression to... I hope this City will be the seat of learning as well as of politics, and that it will also be the home of art."