Percy LEASON | The woodcutter

Percy LEASON
Australia 1889 – New York 1959
United States of America from 1938

The woodcutter 1914 oil on board
45.5 (h) x 35.5 (w) cm
incised in oil paint lower right, 'Percy Leason / 1914'. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra NGA 2011.1282 Purchased 2011

The woodcutter is late in the context of Federation art but early in Percy Leason’s painting career, when he had just completed studies at the National Gallery School in Melbourne. Leason was at this time fervently opposed to the modern developments in European art that were starting to influence Australian painters.

The white Australian rural worker in Federation landscape painting presented the idealised ‘typically Australian’ bush character of strength, masculinity and rugged yet unassuming heroism. In The woodcutter, Leason suggests nostalgia for the disappearing era of labouring by hand as rural industries became increasingly mechanised.

The woodcutter is late in the context of Federation art but early in Percy Leason’s painting career, when he had just completed studies at the National Gallery School in Melbourne. Leason was at this time fervently opposed to the modern developments in European art that were starting to influence Australian painters.

The white Australian rural worker in Federation landscape painting presented the idealised ‘typically Australian’ bush character of strength, masculinity and rugged yet unassuming heroism. In The woodcutter, Leason suggests nostalgia for the disappearing era of labouring by hand as rural industries became increasingly mechanised.

The woodcutter is late in the context of Federation art but early in Percy Leason’s painting career, when he had just completed studies at the National Gallery School in Melbourne. Leason was at this time fervently opposed to the modern developments in European art that were starting to influence Australian painters.

The white Australian rural worker in Federation landscape painting presented the idealised ‘typically Australian’ bush character of strength, masculinity and rugged yet unassuming heroism. In The woodcutter, Leason suggests nostalgia for the disappearing era of labouring by hand as rural industries became increasingly mechanised.




Image detail: W.C. Piguenit Near Liverpool, New South Wales c. 1908
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, acquired with the assistance of the Masterpieces for the Nation Fund 2005