Add-busting

In the battle to wrestle public space from commercial and government interests, street artists strive to saturate the streets with anti-commercial imagery in as many places and as frequently as possible. It is a combative tactic that often necessitates the appropriation, recycling and reclaiming of material at hand. Commercial billboards and advertising posters have become prime targets for street artists who want to creatively express their objection to the corporate control of public space and the evils of a society based on rampant consumerism. Billboard jamming and adbusting are just some of the many sophisticated intervention techniques that artists have incorporated into their street art practice.

My street art is fuelled by a disgust of the flood of designed and formulated commerce whose wasteful indulgence is a form of massively funded, distracting social brainwash. My intention is to revaluate, illuminate and deflate some no-vital corporate illusions. I want to provide a conceptual jolt, a conscious awakening from within the context of a constantly mediated assault upon our environment. To encourage people to feel they can think for themselves and for the work to offer this pause for thought. To have an active relationship with culture beyond the consumer dripfeed; to make and shake and share, not just take.
Marcsta 

I am exploring trademark issues and how trademarking and branding infiltrate our lives on a daily basis. It is actually pretty disgusting … it seems like fewer and fewer companies are owning more and more. It is like this episode that I saw of the Twilight Zone when I was younger where a family was stuck in their house, and everything was branded! They pulled the floorboards up and their house was branded! They discovered that they were actually living in this metal house that was owned by this corporation that owned everything including them. They were also a commodity.
Mini Graff



Goldfish by Lister

Subscribe to newsletter


You can also follow developments on twitter or facebook