DETAIL : 
Martin Johnson HEADE  
United States of America 1819 � 1904-09-04  
Sunlight and shadow: the Newbury Marshes c.1871-75, oil on canvas National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. John Wilmerding Collection (Promised Gift). Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
VIEW ALL WORKS | AUDIO TOUR

EXHIBITION GROUPING : GALLERY 1 | GALLERY 2 | GALLERY 3 | GALLERY 4 | GALLERY 5 | GALLERY 6 |

Gallery Introduction

Turner to Monet presents a new look at landscape painting in the nineteenth century. Works by the finest artists of the time – Turner, Constable, Friedrich, Corot, Courbet, Glover, von Guérard, Church, Streeton, Roberts, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Monet – have been gathered from public and private collections in Australia and from around the world.

Landscape, as an independent genre, developed in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. From its origins as a backdrop for mythological scenes or history paintings, the art of landscape flourished first in Italy and the Netherlands. It became the predominant subject for the first time only about 1800, particularly in England and Germany.

The exhibition shows the extraordinary variety and possibilities of landscape in the nineteenth century. It reveals how landscape painting changed, from portrayals of Classical themes to dramatic and mysterious Romantic scenes. Artists ventured to exotic terrains, from the edges of Europe to America and Australia. By mid-century, especially in France, Realists scrutinised nature anew. They were succeeded by the Impressionists, who experimented with other ways of rendering the landscape.